Roberta Allen, 41 parts of “Pointless Acts,” 18 x 14 inches (each)

Exhibited: Galerie Maier-Hahn, Dusselforf, Germany (1977); Parts shown at John Weber Gallery, New York (1976, 1977, 1978)

Artist book: Published by The Collation Center, NY (1977)

Artist website

Judith Henry, Crumpled Paper Stationary

Description: Henry designed Crumpled Paper Stationary is part of Wooster Enterprises (1976-79), a collaborative, conceptual business she began with artist Jaime Davidovich. Using their own original designs and additional prototypes by George Maciunas, Davidovich and Henry sold small paper products—greeting cards, writing pads, confetti, and other paper goods—to large and small stores throughout the United States. Their intent was to bring conceptual art into a truly commercial arena. After Wooster Enterprises failed, The Museum of Modern Art continued to produce Henry’s crumpled paper stationary. For years, it was one of the Museum store’s best selling items.

Gloria De Filipps Brush, Projections (series), 1975-1981. Gelatin silver print, hand colored with photo dyes and pencils.

More information: artist website

blastedheath:

Sonia Delaunay (French, 1885-1979), Rideau simultané, conceived 1956. Sewn fabric, 199 x 187.7 cm.

 

blastedheath:

Sonia Delaunay (French, 1885-1979), Rideau simultané, conceived 1956. Sewn fabric, 199 x 187.7 cm.


 

Nina Yankowitz, Draped Painting/Blue, 1968–1970, Brooklyn Museum of Art
Description: “My draped paintings were created to challenge the assumption that painting is classified as such when made and presented within a geometric, rectangular, and/or stretched canvas format.”

Nina Yankowitz, Draped Painting/Blue, 1968–1970, Brooklyn Museum of Art

Description: “My draped paintings were created to challenge the assumption that painting is classified as such when made and presented within a geometric, rectangular, and/or stretched canvas format.”

Maude Boltz, Untitled from the AIR Print Portfolio, ca 1975-77. Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Two Faces by Hermine Freed, 1972

Utilizing a split and reversed screen, Freed faces herself, caressing and kissing her doubled image. Without narration, the tape shows Freed suspended between two images, existing as a doubled person.

In light of feminist discourse on women’s alienation from themselves in a male-dominated culture and the co-option of women’s images by advertising and the media, this tape reads as Freed’s attempt to contact her self-image directly—to, in effect, claim her image. [ftp]

(Source: frenchtwist)

Hermine Freed (American 1940-1998), Art Herstory, 1974, Video (color, sound) (00:22:00)
Collections: VDB, MOMA, NBK
Further information: Hermine Freed (American 1940-1998) former Curator of the Boston Institute of Contemporary Art and the Institute of Fine Arts at N.Y.U., is exceptionally well qualified to discuss this subject [of film as art]. She has, for years, been in the forefront of this media with her own Videotapes made together with artists including James Rosenquist, Robert Morris and Roy Lichtenstein.

Cecelia Condit, excerpt, Possibly in Michigan (1983)

Music composed and performed by Karen Skladany
Lyrics - Animal/Cannibal by Karen Skladany
Women: Jill Sands and Karen Skladany

(Source: ceceliacondit.com, via meyle)

whos-afraid-of-postblack-art:

“Only when making the work can I determine the many languages that form the planes on which it is to exist.”
Sam Gilliam, Light Depth, 1969. Corcoran Gallery of Art.

whos-afraid-of-postblack-art:

“Only when making the work can I determine the many languages that form the planes on which it is to exist.”

Sam Gilliam, Light Depth, 1969. Corcoran Gallery of Art.

(via blackcontemporaryart)